Energy Consumers Australia asked their stakeholders, including QCOSS, what changes they would like to see for energy consumers in the future.

Transcript

Neil Horrocks: You know what I'd really love to see, what I think would really be a game-changer for customers, is if we were able to come up with a simple, clear set of language that could be used by everyone in the industry and explaining what's going on and how things affect them because I think we suffer forever from a range and variance of terms and terminology and I think if we could simplify it people would just be in a much better space.

Dale Holliss: It would be excellent if the Australian Energy Regulator could reinstate the Optimisation Rule which was parked back in about 2005 and the other main takeaway from today's meeting was the commitment by Energex and Ergon's replacement ‘Energy Queensland’ towards reducing prices into the future. That's something that was very pleasing to hear.

Fiona Hawthorne: In the course of our research what we found was that there's a confusing array of jurisdictions that cover tenants and their energy supplies. For example, if they're in a unit block that has an embedded network they're not covered or given the same protections than someone in their individual house is and we think that there needs to be a lot more research done in this area.

Luke Berry: Look there are emerging energy systems that can automatically turn on and off pool appliances or dishwashers, washing machines. They haven't really had a lot of uptake and I think they haven't been integrated yet. I'd like to see those sorts of Google systems and other systems coming into the marketplace a lot more I think things like demand tariffs will drive their uptake.

Rose McGrath: Well obviously, ensuring that prices don't go up any further and look, we've seen at both the state and federal government recently efforts to contain those prices, as well as obviously getting a better understanding of how they might be able to change the behaviour around energy-efficiency.

Craig Chambers: Gone are the days that the industry can think it knows what consumers want and we need to now better understand what their thinking is. You know that's in the use of our products and services, whether it's in the use of technology, whether it's in their consumption patterns going forward. I think for a place like Queensland which is a diversely populated, large geographical area we need to be at the forefront of having a more agile sector that can reform.

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